Visit Ghent!

Ghent is one of the beautiful cities to visit in Belgium. Less busy than Antwerp and less an open-air museum than Bruges. Ghent is a charming city where the former wealth of the Middle Ages is still clearly visible in the city center. It is not without reason that Ghent is popular among tourists as a destination for a day or even for a few days. Visitors mainly come to the many cultural-historical buildings, museums and the atmospheric nightlife.

Picture by Pixabay

Together with the other inland waterways, the river Leie offers beautiful atmospheric pictures in Ghent. The most popular part is where the "Graslei" and "Korenlei" lie on the water. Here are a number of beautiful buildings, some of which date back to the Middle Ages. Various tour boats also depart from both slates. In pleasant weather, the terraces, particularly on the Graslei, are busy. Locals and tourists also like to sit on the stone edges on and around the water. Especially in the summer months it is very atmospheric here.

Picture by Pixabay
The 95 meter high belfry tower is the middle of the Ghent tower line. The tower dates from the year 1380 and has a dragon at the top that watches over the city. For a small fee you can climb the stairs of the belfry, after which you have a beautiful view over Ghent.

Picture by Pixabay
A visit to the mystical castle "The Gravensteen" cannot be missed during your city trip in Ghent. This important landmark in Ghent is a fortress with a very turbulent history, closely intertwined with the complex and often turbulent political and social history of the city. It is the only remaining medieval moated castle with an almost intact defense system in Flanders. Your visit to the Gravensteen gives you a complete picture of the knight culture in the 12th century. The gatehouse, the ramparts, the keep, the burial residence and the stables are accessible to visitors.

Picture by Pixabay
You can visit many museums in Ghent. It is therefore useful to purchase a 3-day museum pass. This is offered by participating museums, tourist info points, hotels, city shops and public transport stores. This pass can also be used for the tram and buses in the Ghent city zone.

Top event is the "Gentse Feesten", a traditional folk festival that dates back to the nineteenth century and lasts no less than ten days. These festivals that take place in the summer are the top attraction in Ghent.

The cathedral of Ghent

The church was originally a parish church dedicated to John the Baptist. In 942, Transmar, the bishop of Tournai, inaugurated the church as St. John's Church.

The predecessor of the current cathedral was a Romanesque church from the 12th century. The crypt of this remains. The Romanesque church was gradually replaced by the current one. The construction took place in three phases. The choir was first renovated in the early 14th century. The influence of Northern French Gothic and the Scheldt Gothic can be seen here.

Picture by Pixabay

The ambulatory and the chapels date from the beginning of the 15th century. During the second construction phase, from 1462 to 1538, the 89-meter-high western tower was erected in the style of Brabant Gothic, with sand-lime bricks from the Dilbeek brickwork. The third phase began in 1533: the construction of the ship. Later additions were made in Renaissance, Baroque and Classicist style.

The tower of St Bavo's Cathedral is one of the three in the row of Ghent, together with St Nicholas' Church and the Belfry. The tower itself consists of four floors, and is crowned by four pinnacles of considerable size. The tower was originally awarded a small spire, but it burned down. There are seven bells in the tower, the heaviest being Bavo, with a weight of 5 500 kg, supplied by Florent Delcourt.

Picture by Pixabay
The art patrimony of the Sint-Baafs is historically valuable. In the first place, the world-famous polyptic The Adoration of the Mystic Lamb by Jan van Eyck from 1432.